“Food for Thought” Cookbook book club – America: Farm to Table Cookbook

“Food for Thought” Cookbook book club – America: Farm to Table Cookbook

For our first meeting of 2015 and commemorating the cookbook club’s 1-year anniversary, we focused our cooking on the cookbook America: Farm to Table by Mario Batali.

America: Farm to Table cookbook by Mario Batali

America: Farm to Table cookbook by Mario Batali

In his latest cookbook, the world-renown chef pays homage to the American farmer, whom he deems as the “rock stars” of the food world, through stories, photos and 100 tasty recipes from 14 farms across America. He celebrates their high quality products and their culture defined by hard work, integrity and pride.

In carrying out the evening’s theme, I obtained a few items that showcase Mario’s products and style at each person’s place setting. Yes, it was true Molto Mario right down to the orange croc keychains!

I obtained a few items that showcase Mario’s products and style at each person’s place setting, including the orange crocs!!

I obtained a few items that showcase Mario’s products and style at each person’s place setting, including the orange crocs!!

For an appetizer, I made zucchini fries with tomato aioli. The zucchini have a crispy baked exterior from the panko breadcrumbs and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. With the tomato aioli for dipping, it made for a decadent yet healthy starter. I will be making these again very soon!

Zucchini fries with tomato aioli

Zucchini fries with tomato aioli

To start the meal, Terri made the Focaccia Panzanella.

Focaccia Panzanella

Focaccia Panzanella

Panzanella is a Tuscan salad of bread and tomatoes. It includes chunks of soaked stale bread, tomatoes, cucumbers, red onion and basil, dressed in a red-wine vinegar and olive oil. I can’t wait to make this in the summer when the local tomatoes are in season!

For the main entrée, I made the Barbeque Chicken Thighs with lentils and green apple vinaigrette. I thought it was fitting to begin the New Year with a lentil dish since Italian-American families endure the tradition of welcoming in the New Year with various lentil dishes, symbolizing wealth. In fact, Mario Batali himself said, “It wouldn’t be New Year’s in Italy without lentils.”

Barbeque Chicken Thighs with lentils and green apple vinaigrette.

Barbeque Chicken Thighs with lentils and green apple vinaigrette.

This chicken dish combined a variety of flavors from the pesto-like overnight marinade, the rustic lentil base and the apple, Dijon vinaigrette topping. It was delicious.

Accompanying the chicken were two sides. Terri made the Risi Bisi, sweet pea risotto. While risotto is served year round in northern Italy, especially where there are more rice and cornfields than there are wheat fields, the flavor of risotto varies by season. So in the early spring when peas are being harvested, this version is the hero.

Risi Bisi, sweet pea risotto.

Risi Bisi, sweet pea risotto.

The risotto had a wonderful creamy texture and a salty bite from the diced prosciutto. I could have eaten the entire bowl!

For our second side, Susan made the prosciutto, goat cheese and green bean roll-ups. While this recipe is listed in the appetizer section of the cookbook, we chose to serve is as one of the sides and it held up well with the chicken and risotto.

Prosciutto, goat cheese and green bean roll-ups

Prosciutto, goat cheese and green bean roll-ups

I had seen similar prosciutto roll-ups that are typically made with roasted asparagus, but this version adds a twist to the traditional by kicking it up with the goat cheese and the roasted thin green beans. I think this would be perfect for the upcoming spring holidays!

If we weren’t full enough, Sharon made a beautiful strawberry-mascarpone olive oil cake. I’ve had olive oil cake before and was surprised at how flavorful it was.

Wtrawberry-mascarpone olive oil cake

Strawberry-mascarpone olive oil cake

The olive oil cake is a courser cake than you may be familiar with, but the blend of the mascarpone filling, whipped cream frosting and the berries makes for an amazing combination.

The blend of the mascarpone filling, whipped cream frosting and the berries makes for an amazing combination with the olive oil cake!

The blend of the mascarpone filling, whipped cream frosting and the berries makes for an amazing combination with the olive oil cake!

For our “take home treat,” Susan made almond and honey brittle.

Almond and honey brittle

Almond and honey brittle

The candy was crunchy and highly addictive!

In total, seven dishes were made for the America: Farm to Table cookbook.

Seven dishes were made for the America: Farm to Table cookbook

Seven dishes were made for the America: Farm to Table cookbook

The dinner was a beautifully balanced meal, delicious with every bite – or as we say in Italian, “Molto Bene” meaning very good!

The dinner was Molto Bene!

The dinner was Molto Bene!

We had another delicious meal and enjoyed everyone’s company, especially after being cooped up from the snowy winter!

Our next gathering will be in April. We chose the “Pollan Family Table” cookbook to build our next meal.

We chose the “Pollan Family Table” cookbook for our next meeting.

We chose the “Pollan Family Table” cookbook for our next meeting.

 

Have you ever made any of Mario Batali’s recipes? If so, which is your favorite?

Which of these recipes do you think you’ll be making soon?

 

Disclaimer:  While the cookbook book club was provided with copies of the America: Farm to Table cookbook, the opinions and views expressed above are my own and describe my personal experience. 

Zego Bar Snacks

Zego Bar Snacks

Nowadays store shelves are filled with a wide variety of cereal, energy, nutrition and snack bars. What once was a niche product used largely by athletes post workouts and by dieters as a meal supplement has gained popularity among consumers in general. In order to capture some of the market share and shelf space, bar makers must differentiate their product from the next and ensure consumers understand what sets their bar apart from others.

Zego bar snacks are one of the newer players in the nutrition and snack bars market. They are the only nutrition bars designed to be nourishing and not hurt your stomach, trigger common allergies or spike your blood sugars.

Zego bar snacks are one of the newer players in the nutrition and snack bars market.

Zego bar snacks are one of the newer players in the nutrition and snack bars market.

Zego makes its sunflower seed-based bars without eight major food allergens, including gluten, peanuts, tree nuts (except coconut), soy, dairy, eggs or GMOs. They are also low glycemic, vegan, kosher and paleo-friendly. Zego also uses QR codes on its bar wrappers and boxes that show measurements of specific allergens from the bar’s batch, allowing sensitive consumers to make safe choices.

Zego also uses QR codes on its bar wrappers and boxes that show measurements of specific allergens from the bar’s batch, allowing sensitive consumers to make safe choices.

Zego also uses QR codes on its bar wrappers and boxes that show measurements of specific allergens from the bar’s batch, allowing sensitive consumers to make safe choices.

Zego bars are available in two flavors: Sunflower and chocolate. They have a thick, rich, chewy consistency. You can taste the sunflower in both flavors. The taste of Zego bars received mixed reaction from those who tried the bars I received, including myself. I preferred the sunflower flavor.

Zego bars are available in two flavors:  Sunflower and chocolate.

Zego bars are available in two flavors: Sunflower and chocolate.

Right now, Zego bars are offered mostly in retail stores in the west. You can purchase them online through their website. They retail for $5.75 for a 2-bar sampler package, which is priced in line with similar products.

Zego bars are offered mostly in retail stores in the west.  You can purchase them online through their website.

Zego bars are offered mostly in retail stores in the west. You can purchase them online through their website.

 

Have you ever tried Zego bar snacks?

What’s your favorite nutrition/ snack bar?

 

Disclaimer:  While I was provided with a complimentary sample of Zego bars, the opinions and views expressed above are my own and describe my personal experience.

Mohegan Sun WineFest 2015

Mohegan Sun WineFest 2015

Each January, Mohegan Sun Casino hosts the state’s largest wine and food event. Now in its 12th year, the three-day event features beer, wine, specialty spirits and delectable food dishes — perfect to imbibe and indulge!

Mohegan Sun Casino hosts the state’s largest wine and food event.

Mohegan Sun Casino hosts the state’s largest wine and food event.

At the grand tasting sessions, wine and beer enthusiasts can enjoy tasting over 1,000 brands from all around the world and sampling special sponsor spirits.

 

Wine and beer enthusiasts can enjoy tasting over 1,000 brands from all around the world!

Wine and beer enthusiasts can enjoy tasting over 1,000 brands from all around the world!

Mohegan IMG_1309

You can find your usual favorites and experience new vineyards.

Mohegan 3

You can find your usual favorites and experience new vineyards.

You can find your usual favorites and experience new vineyards.

Also, you can preview of some of the hottest trends quenching the world’s boozy thirst. Molecular mixology uses the equipment and techniques of molecular gastronomy. These methods allow the making of greater intensities and varieties of flavor, flavor combinations and different ways of presenting drinks, for example using gels, powders, foams, atomized sprays as well as affecting the appearance of the cocktail. Imagine having your cocktail in the form of a caviar pop-able sphere!

Molecular mixology

Molecular mixology

You’ll even find cheese, olive oil and chocolate vendors demonstrating how their products best pair with various alcohols.

Also sample cheese, olive oil and chocolate to see which goes best with various wines.

Also sample cheese, olive oil and chocolate to see which goes best with various wines.

The grand tasting also offered the purchase of tastings of fare from participating restaurants. Food exhibitors included Agave Grill, Feng Asian Bistro, First & Last Tavern, Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana, Matunuck Oyster Farm, NoRA Cupcake Company and a few others.

Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana

Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana

NoRA Cupcake Company

NoRA Cupcake Company

If you’re a foodie like me, you’ll enjoy that at Saturday and Sunday’s grand tastings there were also celebrity chef demonstrations throughout the day.

At the grand tastings there were also celebrity chef demonstrations throughout the day.

At the grand tastings there were also celebrity chef demonstrations throughout the day.

Mark Dixon, WFSB meteorologist, was one of the emcees.

Mark Dixon, WFSB meteorologist, was one of the emcees.

Mark Dixon, WFSB meteorologist, was one of the emcees.

On Sunday, the chef demos included Betty Fraser & Manouschka Guerrier, Georges Mokbel, William Kovel and Sandy Squillante. I learned a few interesting cooking tips and techniques.

Chef Georges Mokbel

Chef Georges Mokbel

Chef William Kovel

Chef William Kovel

Some of the celebrity chefs were also available to sign their cookbooks. I obtained Georges Mokbel’s “Everyday to Gourmet” cookbook and had it signed.

Me & Chef Georges Mokbel

Me & Chef Georges Mokbel

Like the name, this cookbook not only shows you how to create flavorful everyday dishes, but it also spins these same dishes into a gourmet level using simple techniques, adapted to the home cook.

"Everyday to Gourmet" Cookbook by Chef Georges Mokbel

“Everyday to Gourmet” Cookbook by Chef Georges Mokbel

We’ve made a few recipes from the cookbook and they are delicious! This is the blueberry French toast, everyday version, which is becoming a staple for Sunday morning breakfasts at my house. The kids say, “It’s the bomb!”

From a day filled with tastings, demos and samplings, you may be asking which beverages were some of my new favorites? I’ll be on the lookout for Fishers Island Lemonade this summer and Gloria Ferrer sparkling wines to enhance a celebration.

Two of my faves -- Fishers Island Lemonade & Gloria Ferrer sparkling wine

Two of my faves — Fishers Island Lemonade & Gloria Ferrer sparkling wine

Christine and I truly enjoyed the Mohegan Sun WineFest and look forward to returning next year.

Christine and I will definitely be back next year!

Christine and I will definitely be back next year!

Now off to the casino for some fun with a little “scratch” cash!

Off to the casino!!

Off to the casino!!

 

Have you ever been to the Mohegan Sun WineFest?

What’s your favorite wine – red or white and brand?

 

Disclaimer:  While I was provided with media tickets to the Mohegan Sun WineFest by their marketing/PR team, the opinions and views expressed above are my own and describe my personal experience at the event. 

Seponifiq Bread and Lettuce Sepo Sauce

Seponifiq Bread and Lettuce Sepo Sauce

If your condiment shelf is anything like mine, it’s loaded with every variety of spices or sauces imparting a particular flavor enhancement to complement the dish. So when a new one comes along, you want to ensure it is worthy of your shelf space. Well clear a spot for a “new jar in town” called Sepo Sauce.

Seponifiq Bread and Lettuce Sepo Sauce

Seponifiq Bread and Lettuce Sepo Sauce

Sepo Sauce is “bread and lettuce sauce” that tastes like a creamy garlic, Dijon sauce with a hint of horseradish. It is not spicy, but cool and creamy with lots of flavor!

Some of the suggested uses include:

  • Salads, veggie trays and as a dip for pita or tortilla chips;
  • Beef, pork and chicken as a finishing sauce
  • Seafood & fish (a great substitute for tartar and/or cocktail sauces)
  • Sandwich spread
  • Onion rings, French fries, vegetable fries as a great dipping sauce

In addition to these recommended uses, I think it would be great as the sauce for coleslaw. I’ll have to try it!

Primarily, we’ve been using it as a burger sauce or as a sandwich spread. It really gives a kick to the ordinary turkey sandwich!

Sepo sauce is perfect on any kind of burger.

Sepo sauce is perfect on any kind of burger.

Sepo sauce has definitely earned a spot on our refrigerator condiment shelf!

Sepo sauce has definitely earned a spot on our refrigerator condiment shelf!

Sepo sauce has definitely earned a spot on our refrigerator condiment shelf!

Sepo sauce costs $4 a bottle, in line with specialty sauces of similar suit. Right now, it’s only available for purchase through the Seponifiq website.

 

Have you ever tried Sepo Sauce?

What’s your favorite condiment for sandwiches and burgers?

 

Disclaimer:  While I was provided with a complimentary sample of Seponifiq Sepo sauce, the opinions and views expressed above are my own and describe my personal experience. 

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

This soup combines the best elements of Italian wedding and minestrone soups into a new original creation which I’m naming “Holy Matrimony Minestrone.” I credit my son for coming up with this witty name.

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

Italian wedding soup typically consists of green vegetables (e.g., escarole, spinach), meat (meatballs) and chicken stock. The name is derived from the Italian term “minestra maritata” (meaning married soup) referring to the fact that the ingredients go well together.

Minestrone is a hearty soup of Italian origin. It is typically made with whatever vegetables are in season, commonly including beans, onions, celery, carrots, tomatoes and stock.

I’ve always enjoyed homemade soup. In fact, one of my greatest food memories is a recollection of times spent with my Nonna (grandma in Italian). She made the most amazing soups. There weren’t any recipes. She made each version from whatever she had in the pantry, and it always tasted delicious! Over the years, I’ve tried to recreate some of her soups. With these memories and her inspiration, I dedicate this soup recipe to her memory.

 

Chicken Meatballs

1 lb. ground chicken

¾ – 1 cup of breadcrumbs (start with ¾ and add more if needed)

¼ c dried chopped parsley

2 large eggs

2 tbsp. milk

2 tbsp. ketchup

¾ c grated Romano cheese

Freshly cracked sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

Canola oil

In a large bowl mix together the breadcrumbs, parsley, eggs, milk, ketchup, cheese, salt and pepper. Combine the mixture with the ground chicken. Mix well, but don’t overwork the meat mixture. Using a small sized cookie scoop, scoop up the mixture and roll it into small balls. Place the balls onto a wax paper lined dish.

Scoop up the mixture and roll it into small balls

Scoop up the mixture and roll it into small balls

Heat about 1” of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Once the oil is heated, add about 10-12 meatballs at a time, placing them carefully into the hot oil. Cook without moving until they are browned on the bottom (about 2-3 minutes). Turn the meatballs and brown on the other side (about 2-3 minutes longer).

Cook the meatballs until they are browned

Cook the meatballs until they are browned

Transfer the cooked meatballs to a paper towel lined plate and set aside. Continue this frying process until all the meatballs are cooked.

Transfer the cooked meatballs to a paper towel lined plate and set aside

Transfer the cooked meatballs to a paper towel lined plate and set aside

This recipe will yield about three dozen mini meatballs. You’ll only need about 30 for the soup so save the rest for a nice grinder.  I prefer chicken meatballs for this soup, as they are lighter and better suited for soup than beef ones.

 

Holy Matrimony Minestrone Soup

2 tbsp. olive oil

4 medium-sized shallots, finely chopped

4 celery stalks, roughly chopped

4 carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, cleaned and minced

3 tbsp. tomato paste

2, 14-oz cans of petite diced tomatoes, not drained

75 oz. chicken stock (low sodium, fat free) (one box and 3 cans)

¼ c fresh parsley, minced

1 ½ cups small pasta (such as tubetini, small egg bow ties or tiny shells)

1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed thoroughly

½ bag baby spinach, chop the leaves in half

Salt & pepper to taste

In a large stockpot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and allow cook for 2 minutes. Add the celery and carrots. Sauté for 5 minutes, until they begin to soften. Add in the garlic and sauté for a minute. Add the tomato paste, chicken broth, diced tomatoes (with the juices) and the parsley. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to simmer, cooking for 20 minutes.

Bring the soup to a boil and reduce the heat to simmer.

Bring the soup to a boil and reduce the heat to simmer.

Add 3/4ths of the meatballs to the soup. Allow simmering for 5 minutes.

Add the meatballs to the soup and allow to simmer for another 5 minutes.

Add the meatballs to the soup and allow to simmer for another 5 minutes.

Add the chickpeas and the pasta. Let it cook for another 10 minutes. Lastly, add in the spinach and let it cook until the leaves start to wilt (about a minute).

Remove from the heat and serve immediately.

Ladle the soup into bowls and pair it with sliced rustic, crusty bread. Finish the soup with grated Parmesan cheese, if desired.

Ladle the soup into bowls and pair it with sliced rustic, crusty bread.  Finish the soup with grated Parmesan cheese.

Ladle the soup into bowls and pair it with sliced rustic, crusty bread. Finish the soup with grated Parmesan cheese.

Serves 6-8

Leftovers will keep in a sealed container for 3-4 days in the refrigerator. To reheat, simmer over medium to low heat until the meatballs are hot through.

This soup is very hearty and with the meatballs in it, you will find yourself needing a fork and knife in addition to a spoon in order to eat it!

This soup is very hearty and with the meatballs in it, you will find yourself needing a fork and knife in addition to a spoon in order to eat it!

This soup is perfect once the chilly weather hits. It is very hearty and with the meatballs in it, you will find yourself needing a fork and knife in addition to a spoon in order to eat it.

I quantify this recipe as “medium” difficulty. I give it that rating not because it requires extensive culinary expertise, but because it requires some time to assemble all the parts. Trust me it’s worth the time to make!

I hope you “fall in love” with this recipe as much as my family has, and enjoy it as much as “I do.”

 

What’s your favorite soup?

Do you use a recipe to make soup or do you create it “on the fly?”

Butternut Squash Risotto

Butternut Squash Risotto

For some reason, I’ve always been intimidated to make risotto. It seemed like a complicated process that was for expert chefs. Earlier this year, one of the resolutions I made with myself was to be more adventurous with food and cooking. So after watching a few people make the dish, I decided to give it a try. I will admit, I am proud of my result and the family thought it was delicious!

Butternut squash risotto - not just for expert chefs!

Butternut squash risotto – not just for expert chefs!

Risotto is a rice dish cooked in broth to a creamy consistency. It originated in northern Italy where it is served as a “primo piatto” (first course) before the main entrée. At many restaurants around here, you will find it served as an entrée and I’ve even seen some sweet variations served as a dessert – seems strange, but think of rice pudding.

A few quick tips before you begin:

  • It is essential that any liquid (both or cream) you are adding to the rice be hot, so have separate pots of the liquids. This ensures that as it is added to the rice it doesn’t stop the cooking process.
  • Use a very wide pan so the rice can cook evenly as one layer.

 

Butternut Squash Risotto

½ whole butternut squash, peeled, seeded and diced (or save yourself some time and buy it already cleaned and cut at the grocery store)

6 cups of chicken broth (hot and in a side pot)

2 cups of Arborio rice

3 tbsp. unsalted butter

1 shallot, finely chopped

¼ cup heavy cream (warmed and in a side pan)

Finely minced parsley, for serving

Finely minced chives, for serving

Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Freshly cracked sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

 

Bring the broth to a boil in a side pot. Reduce the heat and keep it at a simmer.

Melt the butter in a large, wide sauté pan over medium heat.  Add the chopped shallot and sauté until it becomes soft.  Add the squash to the sauté pan and cook it for about 5 minutes, until it becomes slightly golden.

Butternut squash pairs nicely with the rice to create this great fall/ winter dish!

Butternut squash pairs nicely with the rice to create this great fall/ winter dish!

Add ¼ cup water and cook 10-15 minutes more until the squash is tender.  Using the back of a wooden spoon, partially smash the squash by pressing down on the cooked cubes.  Stir in the rice, seasoning with salt and pepper.

Arborio rice is a high-starch, short-grained rice used for making risotto.

Arborio rice is a high-starch, short-grained rice used for making risotto.

Cook it over medium-low heat for about a minute, allowing the rice to slightly toast.

Add a ladleful of hot stock to the rice and cook, stirring until it absorbs, repeating this process.

Add a ladleful of hot stock to the rice and cook, stirring until it absorbs, repeating this process.

Add a ladleful of hot stock to the rice and cook, stirring until it absorbs. Be careful not to add too much stock at once.  Continue adding the hot stock, one ladleful at a time, stirring until absorbed each time before adding more. Repeat this process for about 15-20 minutes, adding the hot cream toward the end of the cycle (within the last 5 minutes).

The risotto is cooked when you can drag the spoon through the center of the pan and it makes a clean line in the rice for a few seconds, as well as it is slightly al dente to the taste. Season with more salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with the parsley, chives and Parmesan.

Yields 4-6 (or more) servings.

Butternut squash risotto - simple enough for the everyday cook!

Butternut squash risotto – simple enough for the everyday cook!

 

Do you like risotto?

How have you ever made risotto? If so, what kind did you make?

Deconstructed Bruschetta with Honey-Roasted Tomatoes

Deconstructed Bruschetta with Honey-Roasted Tomatoes

Deconstructed bruschetta is one of my “easy to make,” yet “quick to impress guests” appetizers. I derived this recipe by adapting some elements from appetizers I had at some of my favorite restaurants. When you pull together the sum of these parts into your personally created custom bruschetta, you will find that you’ve created the perfect bite!

Your personally created custom bruschetta is the perfect bite!

Your personally created custom bruschetta is the perfect bite!

Bruschetta is an Italian antipasto (before the meal) that typically includes grilled bread topped with tomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat or cheese. The most popular form contains fresh tomato, fresh basil, garlic and fresh mozzarella on top of the toasted bread.

Bruschetta is an Italian antipasto that typically includes grilled bread topped with tomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat or cheese.

Bruschetta is an Italian antipasto that typically includes grilled bread topped with tomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat or cheese.

A few quick tips before you begin:

  • Since the roasted tomatoes will last for 2-3 days in the refrigerator, I usually prepare them a day ahead of when I’m serving the bruschetta. Just be sure to allow the roasted tomatoes to come to room temperature before serving.
  • Also, I mix up the ricotta earlier in the day that I’m serving it to allow the flavors to blend together.

 

Honey-Roasted Tomatoes

1 quart (or 2 pints) grape tomatoes cut in half lengthwise

1 ½ tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2 tbsp. clover honey (lightly spray the measuring spoon with non-stick spray so the honey comes out easily)

1 tsp. thyme leaves (dried or fresh)

1 tsp. dried basil

1 tsp. fresh cracked sea salt

½ tsp. freshly ground pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Line a large baking sheet pan with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, combine the cut tomatoes, EVOO, honey, thyme, basil, salt and pepper. Mix together so the tomatoes are coated. Using a slotted spoon, scoop the tomatoes out of the bowl (leaving behind the liquid) and lay them onto the prepared baking sheet. Be sure all the tomatoes are cut-side up, before placing into the oven.

The tomatoes are prepared and ready for slow roasting!

The tomatoes are prepared and ready for slow roasting!

Bake the tomatoes for between 1 hour and 15 to 1 hour and 30 minutes. The tomatoes are done when they are shriveled and brown. Allow cooling on the baking sheet before removing.

The tomatoes are done when they are shriveled and brown.

The tomatoes are done when they are shriveled and brown.

 

Toasting the bread:

Slice one French baguette into ¼ inch slices. Lay the on a baking sheet. Using your oven broiler, toast them under a high heat broiler for a few minutes. Keep a watch on them, as they will burn easily. Allow cooling on the baking sheet.

 

Bruschetta toppings:

I have served bruschetta with a variety of toppings, including my homemade pesto, herbed ricotta (a Barefoot Contessa recipe) or honey, sea salt ricotta.

I have served bruschetta with a variety of toppings, including homemade pesto, herbed ricotta or honey, sea salt ricotta.

I have served bruschetta with a variety of toppings, including homemade pesto, herbed ricotta or honey, sea salt ricotta.

To make the honey, sea salt ricotta, simply mix together a 16 oz. container of ricotta (you can use part-skim but not fat-free) with 1 tbsp. of clover honey and a few cracks of sea salt. Combine and taste. Add more honey and salt to your taste. Refrigerate until serving.

 

Yields 6-8 (or more) generous servings.

 

Do you like bruschetta?

How have you ever made bruschetta? If so, what’s your favorite topping?

What’s your “easy to make,” “quick to impress guests” appetizer recipe?