San Giuseppe Salami Company by Giacomo

San Giuseppe Salami Company by Giacomo

The San Giuseppe Salami Company is an offshoot of Giacomo’s Italian Market. The market has been selling homemade, authentic Italian products for over nine years in Greensboro, NC. Now the market brings its products direct to your doorstop!

San Giuseppe Salami Company is an offshoot of Giacomo’s Italian Market.

San Giuseppe Salami Company is an offshoot of Giacomo’s Italian Market.

True robust Italian flavors from homemade sausages, salamis and cheeses to other imported Italian treats are what Giacomo’s Italian Market is all about. I had the opportunity to receive some of their specialty products delivered directly to me.

The Italian Dinner Box includes sweet and hot sopressata, Locatelli cheese, sesame breadsticks, cannellini beans and rigatoni pasta. I also received a round chunk of imported Provolone cheese and Milano salami.

The Italian Dinner Box includes sweet and hot sopressata, Locatelli cheese, sesame breadsticks, cannellini beans and rigatoni pasta. I also received a round chunk of imported Provolone cheese and Milano salami.

I received the Italian Dinner Box, which includes sweet and hot sopressata, Locatelli cheese, sesame breadsticks, cannellini beans and rigatoni pasta – all the favorites for a beautiful Italian family meal. Additionally, I received a round chunk of imported Provolone cheese and Milano salami.

San Giuseppe salami, sopresattas and Italian cheeses.

San Giuseppe salami, sopresattas and Italian cheeses.

I split up the items I received and enjoyed them over a few family occasions. First, I cracked open the rigatoni pasta for a weeknight family dinner.

Rigatoni pasta

Rigatoni pasta imported from Italy

I made a batch of my sausage, tomato and cream sauce for the pasta. You can tell it’s high-quality pasta because it had a nice firm texture.

Rigatoni pasta with sausage, tomato and cream sauce - a delicious dinner!

Rigatoni pasta with sausage, tomato and cream sauce – a delicious dinner!

I topped the pasta with some freshly grated Locatelli cheese that also was included in my package. Locatelli is a brand of Pecorino Romano cheese made of 100% pure sheep’s milk that’s then been aged over nine months at a minimum. We’ve been enjoying that cheese on top of many dishes of pasta since!

I decided to save the cheese, salami and sopressatas and serve them as an antipasto on Easter. Everyone loved snacking on these Italian treats before the traditional Easter dinner. My parents, the true Italian critics, commented on the authenticity of these high-quality products.

The cheese, salami and sopressatas made a wonderful antipasto on Easter!

The cheese, salami and sopressatas made a wonderful antipasto on Easter!

I earmarked the breadsticks and cannellini beans for a pot of my Holy Matrimony Minestrone soup. That will be the perfect meal on a cooler day!

I earmarked the breadsticks and cannellini beans for a pot of my Holy Matrimony Minestrone soup.

I earmarked the breadsticks and cannellini beans for a pot of my Holy Matrimony Minestrone soup.

All of the products I received are available for purchase through the San Giuseppe Salami by Giacomo website.

We really enjoyed all the San Giuseppe Salami by Giacomo items!

We really enjoyed all the San Giuseppe Salami by Giacomo items!

The Italian dinner box would make a perfect holiday gift. We really enjoyed all the items!

 

Have you ever tried San Giuseppe salamis or Giacomo’s Italian Market products?

What’s your favorite imported Italian treat?

 

Disclaimer:  While I was provided with a complimentary sample of San Giuseppe salamis and Giacomo’s Italian Dinner box products, the opinions and views expressed above are my own and describe my personal experience.

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

This soup combines the best elements of Italian wedding and minestrone soups into a new original creation which I’m naming “Holy Matrimony Minestrone.” I credit my son for coming up with this witty name.

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

Holy Matrimony Minestrone

Italian wedding soup typically consists of green vegetables (e.g., escarole, spinach), meat (meatballs) and chicken stock. The name is derived from the Italian term “minestra maritata” (meaning married soup) referring to the fact that the ingredients go well together.

Minestrone is a hearty soup of Italian origin. It is typically made with whatever vegetables are in season, commonly including beans, onions, celery, carrots, tomatoes and stock.

I’ve always enjoyed homemade soup. In fact, one of my greatest food memories is a recollection of times spent with my Nonna (grandma in Italian). She made the most amazing soups. There weren’t any recipes. She made each version from whatever she had in the pantry, and it always tasted delicious! Over the years, I’ve tried to recreate some of her soups. With these memories and her inspiration, I dedicate this soup recipe to her memory.

 

Chicken Meatballs

1 lb. ground chicken

¾ – 1 cup of breadcrumbs (start with ¾ and add more if needed)

¼ c dried chopped parsley

2 large eggs

2 tbsp. milk

2 tbsp. ketchup

¾ c grated Romano cheese

Freshly cracked sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

Canola oil

In a large bowl mix together the breadcrumbs, parsley, eggs, milk, ketchup, cheese, salt and pepper. Combine the mixture with the ground chicken. Mix well, but don’t overwork the meat mixture. Using a small sized cookie scoop, scoop up the mixture and roll it into small balls. Place the balls onto a wax paper lined dish.

Scoop up the mixture and roll it into small balls

Scoop up the mixture and roll it into small balls

Heat about 1” of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Once the oil is heated, add about 10-12 meatballs at a time, placing them carefully into the hot oil. Cook without moving until they are browned on the bottom (about 2-3 minutes). Turn the meatballs and brown on the other side (about 2-3 minutes longer).

Cook the meatballs until they are browned

Cook the meatballs until they are browned

Transfer the cooked meatballs to a paper towel lined plate and set aside. Continue this frying process until all the meatballs are cooked.

Transfer the cooked meatballs to a paper towel lined plate and set aside

Transfer the cooked meatballs to a paper towel lined plate and set aside

This recipe will yield about three dozen mini meatballs. You’ll only need about 30 for the soup so save the rest for a nice grinder.  I prefer chicken meatballs for this soup, as they are lighter and better suited for soup than beef ones.

 

Holy Matrimony Minestrone Soup

2 tbsp. olive oil

4 medium-sized shallots, finely chopped

4 celery stalks, roughly chopped

4 carrots, peeled and roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, cleaned and minced

3 tbsp. tomato paste

2, 14-oz cans of petite diced tomatoes, not drained

75 oz. chicken stock (low sodium, fat free) (one box and 3 cans)

¼ c fresh parsley, minced

1 ½ cups small pasta (such as tubetini, small egg bow ties or tiny shells)

1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed thoroughly

½ bag baby spinach, chop the leaves in half

Salt & pepper to taste

In a large stockpot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and allow cook for 2 minutes. Add the celery and carrots. Sauté for 5 minutes, until they begin to soften. Add in the garlic and sauté for a minute. Add the tomato paste, chicken broth, diced tomatoes (with the juices) and the parsley. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to simmer, cooking for 20 minutes.

Bring the soup to a boil and reduce the heat to simmer.

Bring the soup to a boil and reduce the heat to simmer.

Add 3/4ths of the meatballs to the soup. Allow simmering for 5 minutes.

Add the meatballs to the soup and allow to simmer for another 5 minutes.

Add the meatballs to the soup and allow to simmer for another 5 minutes.

Add the chickpeas and the pasta. Let it cook for another 10 minutes. Lastly, add in the spinach and let it cook until the leaves start to wilt (about a minute).

Remove from the heat and serve immediately.

Ladle the soup into bowls and pair it with sliced rustic, crusty bread. Finish the soup with grated Parmesan cheese, if desired.

Ladle the soup into bowls and pair it with sliced rustic, crusty bread.  Finish the soup with grated Parmesan cheese.

Ladle the soup into bowls and pair it with sliced rustic, crusty bread. Finish the soup with grated Parmesan cheese.

Serves 6-8

Leftovers will keep in a sealed container for 3-4 days in the refrigerator. To reheat, simmer over medium to low heat until the meatballs are hot through.

This soup is very hearty and with the meatballs in it, you will find yourself needing a fork and knife in addition to a spoon in order to eat it!

This soup is very hearty and with the meatballs in it, you will find yourself needing a fork and knife in addition to a spoon in order to eat it!

This soup is perfect once the chilly weather hits. It is very hearty and with the meatballs in it, you will find yourself needing a fork and knife in addition to a spoon in order to eat it.

I quantify this recipe as “medium” difficulty. I give it that rating not because it requires extensive culinary expertise, but because it requires some time to assemble all the parts. Trust me it’s worth the time to make!

I hope you “fall in love” with this recipe as much as my family has, and enjoy it as much as “I do.”

 

What’s your favorite soup?

Do you use a recipe to make soup or do you create it “on the fly?”

Butternut Squash Risotto

Butternut Squash Risotto

For some reason, I’ve always been intimidated to make risotto. It seemed like a complicated process that was for expert chefs. Earlier this year, one of the resolutions I made with myself was to be more adventurous with food and cooking. So after watching a few people make the dish, I decided to give it a try. I will admit, I am proud of my result and the family thought it was delicious!

Butternut squash risotto - not just for expert chefs!

Butternut squash risotto – not just for expert chefs!

Risotto is a rice dish cooked in broth to a creamy consistency. It originated in northern Italy where it is served as a “primo piatto” (first course) before the main entrée. At many restaurants around here, you will find it served as an entrée and I’ve even seen some sweet variations served as a dessert – seems strange, but think of rice pudding.

A few quick tips before you begin:

  • It is essential that any liquid (both or cream) you are adding to the rice be hot, so have separate pots of the liquids. This ensures that as it is added to the rice it doesn’t stop the cooking process.
  • Use a very wide pan so the rice can cook evenly as one layer.

 

Butternut Squash Risotto

½ whole butternut squash, peeled, seeded and diced (or save yourself some time and buy it already cleaned and cut at the grocery store)

6 cups of chicken broth (hot and in a side pot)

2 cups of Arborio rice

3 tbsp. unsalted butter

1 shallot, finely chopped

¼ cup heavy cream (warmed and in a side pan)

Finely minced parsley, for serving

Finely minced chives, for serving

Freshly grated Parmesan cheese

Freshly cracked sea salt

Freshly ground pepper

 

Bring the broth to a boil in a side pot. Reduce the heat and keep it at a simmer.

Melt the butter in a large, wide sauté pan over medium heat.  Add the chopped shallot and sauté until it becomes soft.  Add the squash to the sauté pan and cook it for about 5 minutes, until it becomes slightly golden.

Butternut squash pairs nicely with the rice to create this great fall/ winter dish!

Butternut squash pairs nicely with the rice to create this great fall/ winter dish!

Add ¼ cup water and cook 10-15 minutes more until the squash is tender.  Using the back of a wooden spoon, partially smash the squash by pressing down on the cooked cubes.  Stir in the rice, seasoning with salt and pepper.

Arborio rice is a high-starch, short-grained rice used for making risotto.

Arborio rice is a high-starch, short-grained rice used for making risotto.

Cook it over medium-low heat for about a minute, allowing the rice to slightly toast.

Add a ladleful of hot stock to the rice and cook, stirring until it absorbs, repeating this process.

Add a ladleful of hot stock to the rice and cook, stirring until it absorbs, repeating this process.

Add a ladleful of hot stock to the rice and cook, stirring until it absorbs. Be careful not to add too much stock at once.  Continue adding the hot stock, one ladleful at a time, stirring until absorbed each time before adding more. Repeat this process for about 15-20 minutes, adding the hot cream toward the end of the cycle (within the last 5 minutes).

The risotto is cooked when you can drag the spoon through the center of the pan and it makes a clean line in the rice for a few seconds, as well as it is slightly al dente to the taste. Season with more salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with the parsley, chives and Parmesan.

Yields 4-6 (or more) servings.

Butternut squash risotto - simple enough for the everyday cook!

Butternut squash risotto – simple enough for the everyday cook!

 

Do you like risotto?

How have you ever made risotto? If so, what kind did you make?

Deconstructed Bruschetta with Honey-Roasted Tomatoes

Deconstructed Bruschetta with Honey-Roasted Tomatoes

Deconstructed bruschetta is one of my “easy to make,” yet “quick to impress guests” appetizers. I derived this recipe by adapting some elements from appetizers I had at some of my favorite restaurants. When you pull together the sum of these parts into your personally created custom bruschetta, you will find that you’ve created the perfect bite!

Your personally created custom bruschetta is the perfect bite!

Your personally created custom bruschetta is the perfect bite!

Bruschetta is an Italian antipasto (before the meal) that typically includes grilled bread topped with tomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat or cheese. The most popular form contains fresh tomato, fresh basil, garlic and fresh mozzarella on top of the toasted bread.

Bruschetta is an Italian antipasto that typically includes grilled bread topped with tomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat or cheese.

Bruschetta is an Italian antipasto that typically includes grilled bread topped with tomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat or cheese.

A few quick tips before you begin:

  • Since the roasted tomatoes will last for 2-3 days in the refrigerator, I usually prepare them a day ahead of when I’m serving the bruschetta. Just be sure to allow the roasted tomatoes to come to room temperature before serving.
  • Also, I mix up the ricotta earlier in the day that I’m serving it to allow the flavors to blend together.

 

Honey-Roasted Tomatoes

1 quart (or 2 pints) grape tomatoes cut in half lengthwise

1 ½ tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2 tbsp. clover honey (lightly spray the measuring spoon with non-stick spray so the honey comes out easily)

1 tsp. thyme leaves (dried or fresh)

1 tsp. dried basil

1 tsp. fresh cracked sea salt

½ tsp. freshly ground pepper

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Line a large baking sheet pan with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, combine the cut tomatoes, EVOO, honey, thyme, basil, salt and pepper. Mix together so the tomatoes are coated. Using a slotted spoon, scoop the tomatoes out of the bowl (leaving behind the liquid) and lay them onto the prepared baking sheet. Be sure all the tomatoes are cut-side up, before placing into the oven.

The tomatoes are prepared and ready for slow roasting!

The tomatoes are prepared and ready for slow roasting!

Bake the tomatoes for between 1 hour and 15 to 1 hour and 30 minutes. The tomatoes are done when they are shriveled and brown. Allow cooling on the baking sheet before removing.

The tomatoes are done when they are shriveled and brown.

The tomatoes are done when they are shriveled and brown.

 

Toasting the bread:

Slice one French baguette into ¼ inch slices. Lay the on a baking sheet. Using your oven broiler, toast them under a high heat broiler for a few minutes. Keep a watch on them, as they will burn easily. Allow cooling on the baking sheet.

 

Bruschetta toppings:

I have served bruschetta with a variety of toppings, including my homemade pesto, herbed ricotta (a Barefoot Contessa recipe) or honey, sea salt ricotta.

I have served bruschetta with a variety of toppings, including homemade pesto, herbed ricotta or honey, sea salt ricotta.

I have served bruschetta with a variety of toppings, including homemade pesto, herbed ricotta or honey, sea salt ricotta.

To make the honey, sea salt ricotta, simply mix together a 16 oz. container of ricotta (you can use part-skim but not fat-free) with 1 tbsp. of clover honey and a few cracks of sea salt. Combine and taste. Add more honey and salt to your taste. Refrigerate until serving.

 

Yields 6-8 (or more) generous servings.

 

Do you like bruschetta?

How have you ever made bruschetta? If so, what’s your favorite topping?

What’s your “easy to make,” “quick to impress guests” appetizer recipe?

La Pizza/ La Pasta restaurant, Eataly, NYC

La Pizza/ La Pasta restaurant, Eataly, NYC

For the second part of my foodie day in NYC, we chose to eat at one of the restaurants in the Eataly, NYC Italian market/ mall.

Even the restaurant plates carry Eataly's logo.

Even the restaurant plates carry Eataly’s logo.

Eataly has seven sit down restaurants with both table and counter seats. Each restaurant is positioned next to the market area that provides its fresh ingredients. Le Verdure is next to the produce market; La Piazza is next to the fresh mozzarella and Salumi and cheese counters. Il Pesce is next to the fishmonger. La Pizza & Pasta is next to the bakery and fresh pasta stations. Manzo is next to the butcher shop. Pranzo is in the cooking school and Birreria is a rooftop restaurant that brews its own cask ales.

Eataly has seven sit down restaurants with both table and counter seats.

Eataly has seven sit down restaurants with both table and counter seats.

We chose to eat at La Pizza & Pasta after being completely fascinated with the fresh breads and pasta being made before our eyes. The restaurant’s menu is divided into three main sections: Antipasti, Pizzas and Pastas. Our waitress explained that the left column within the pasta section is dried pasta selections and the right column represented their fresh pastas items.

La Pasta's menu is divided into three main sections.

La Pasta’s menu is divided into three main sections.

As we continued to peruse the menu, our waitress brought us some of the market’s freshly made Italian bread with their extra virgin olive oil for dipping.

Freshly made Italian bread with extra virgin olive oil for dipping.

Freshly made Italian bread with extra virgin olive oil for dipping.

We decided to start our dining by sharing the Antipasto Misto. The menu stated that it’s a selection of the chef’s daily-assorted vegetables. The waitress clarified the menu and told us that it included four items: assorted olives, roasted peppers, roasted butternut squash and eggplant Caponata with toasted bread.

Antipasto Misto - a selection of the chef’s daily-assorted vegetables.

Antipasto Misto – a selection of the chef’s daily-assorted vegetables.

We are glad we selected this as our starter because every one of the items was delicious and light. It was a perfect starter for our meal.  My favorite was the eggplant.

Keeping with the light theme, Gayle chose the Insalata di Finocchio. It was a beautiful salad that included arugula, fennel, shaved Parmigiano Reggiano with lemon vinaigrette. She loved every bite!

Insalata di Finocchio

Insalata di Finocchio

Terri and I couldn’t resist the fresh pasta selections. I chose the Tagliatelle al Ragu di Manzo. It was house made fettuccini-like pasta with short-rib tomato sauce. The pasta was cooked to perfection. It reminded me of my Nona’s homemade pasta and sauce.

Tagliatelle al Ragu di Manzo

Tagliatelle al Ragu di Manzo

Terri chose the Ravioli di Zucca. It was house made ravioli filled with roasted butternut squash, Grana Padano cheese and almond Amaretti cookies, finished with a light brown butter and sage sauce. It was delicious – I tasted it. It was a perfect dish for the fall season.

Ravioli di Zucca

Ravioli di Zucca

We all really enjoyed our lunch at La Pizza/ La Pasta restaurant. I believe we selected well for our first time to Eataly NYC.  I would recommend getting there on the earlier side of lunch because it is first come first served seating and it was completely full by noon.

I look forward to returning to Eataly NYC and trying another one of the six remaining restaurants!

 

Have you ever eaten at any of the restaurants at Eataly NYC?

What’s your favorite kind of homemade pasta and sauce?

Eataly, NYC

Eataly, NYC

Ever since Eataly NYC opened in 2010 I’ve been dying to visit the high-end Italian food market/ mall. Earlier this week, I fulfilled my desire to visit and made the trek to NYC for a food-filled day, with Eataly as one of my stops.

Eataly NYC is located on 23rd street & 5th Avenue.

Eataly NYC is located on 23rd street & 5th Avenue.

In 2007, Oscar Farinetti first founded Eataly in Turin, Italy. It was part of the initial vision to expand locations elsewhere in Italy and New York City. Today there are 31 Eataly locations with two in the United States (NYC and Chicago) and 16 throughout Italy. Among the planned future locations in the United States are Boston, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Los Angeles and a second in NYC.

Today there are 31 Eataly locations.

Today there are 31 Eataly locations.

The New York City location is owned by a partnership including Mario Batali, Lidia Bastianich and Joe Bastianich. And if you didn’t know this beforehand, you would realize it as you walk through the market because Mario, Lidia and Joe’s products proliferate throughout.

Mario Batali, Lidia and Joe Bastianich's products proliferate throughout Eataly NYC.

Mario Batali, Lidia and Joe Bastianich’s products proliferate throughout Eataly NYC.

Eataly consists of two main branches: a high-end Italian food market and seven sit-down restaurants with both table and bar seating all contained within a mall-type atmosphere.

Eataly has seven sit-down restaurants with both table and bar seating serving a variety of foods.

Eataly has seven sit-down restaurants with both table and bar seating serving a variety of foods.

We chose to eat at La Pizza – La Pasta. I’ll be providing you with my full review very soon, but will say it was delicious!

The market is split into two main sections: House made and the Best of Italy and America. In the house made area, there is fresh food made in house. You will find fresh-made bakery items, mozzarella, gelato, pastry and pasta. I was fascinated to see the fresh pasta being made both by machine and by hand.

The fresh pasta is being made by machine - fresh ravioli!

The fresh pasta is being made by machine – fresh ravioli!

The chefs are making fresh gnocchi by hand.

The chefs are making fresh gnocchi by hand.

There is every kind of fresh pasta you can think of available for purchase from the pasta counter.

The fresh pasta counter has so many different varieties.

The fresh pasta counter has so many different varieties.

The Best of Italy and America market offers beauty, books and housewares, beer, beverages, dry pasta and rice, coffee and tea, dolci and chocolate, olive oil, vinegars, preserves and honey, sauces and condiments, dairy, cheese, and salumi.

The dolci and chocolate section was very tempting.

The dolci and chocolate section was very tempting.

I was amazed to find chocolate torrone. You can easily find the vanilla nougat candy, but the chocolate is a rare find. I’ll save this for Christmas Eve dinner.

Chocolate torrone - an amazing find for the Christmas holiday!

Chocolate torrone – an amazing find for the Christmas holiday!

You also can find the freshest products in the seafood and butcher counters.

Eataly's fresh meat counter.

Eataly’s fresh meat counter.

The produce is fresh from local farms.

Produce fresh from the local farms.

Produce fresh from the local farms.

The salumi offers a variety of imported Italian cold cuts and cheese.

The salumi had a wide variety of italian cold cuts and cheeses.

The salumi had a wide variety of italian cold cuts and cheeses.

I was amazed at the size of the whole Parmesan cheese wheels!

"I'd like a little Parmesan cheese, please."

“I’d like a little Parmesan cheese, please.”

The concept behind Eataly is to challenge the predisposition that quality products are only available to a select few. The market/ mall brings good eating and shopping to all – not limited to connoisseurs. Eat Better, Life Better Today. The shirts worn by the staff exemplify this philosophy.

Love this philosophy!

Love this philosophy!

We truly enjoyed our time at Eataly and look forward to returning and trying more of the products and restaurants.

 

Have you ever been to Eataly NYC?

What’s your favorite authentic Italian food product?

Treva Restaurant & Bar

Treva Restaurant & Bar

The girls from work and I headed out for another Happy Hour adventure. Treva restaurant and bar in West Hartford center was our destination.

Treva restaurant and bar is located in West Hartford center.

Treva restaurant and bar is located in West Hartford center.

Treva is one of two restaurants owned by Chef Dorjan Puka, a veteran chef for the Max restaurant group. Treva features chef-inspired Northern Italian innovative cooking.

Treva features chef-inspired Northern Italian innovative cooking.

Treva features chef-inspired Northern Italian innovative cooking.

We sat in the bar area, which is quite cozy. While there are several booths and counter seating, the booths are mostly for parties of 2 people with only two tables that could fit four maximum – not a Happy Hour destination for larger groups.

The Happy Hour menu features a nice selection of fun cocktails, wines and beers for $5 – 6. Additionally there is a great selection of Happy Hour appetizers priced at $2 and $5.

The happy hour menu has a great selection of  appetizers priced at $2 and $5.

The happy hour menu has a great selection of appetizers priced at $2 and $5.

We enjoy ordering several items from the Happy Hour menu and sharing. Once we’ve tasted several, we then determine if we will try others or order more of the same.

Dicasa salad and homemade gnocchi.

Dicasa salad and homemade gnocchi.

We each started with the Dicasa salad. It has very fresh mixed green lettuce with a wonderful balsamic dressing. It’s salad like I had growing up – nothing elaborate, but fresh and delicious!

We also ordered the gnocchi and Tuscan fries. The Tuscan fries are flavored with rosemary, truffle oil and Parmesan Reggiano cheese. They were so delicious that we wanted to eat the excess cheese that remained on the plate after the fries were all gone!

The Tuscan fries are flavored with rosemary, truffle oil and Parmesan Reggiano cheese.

The Tuscan fries are flavored with rosemary, truffle oil and Parmesan Reggiano cheese.

The gnocchi were handmade and served with a light sauce that consisted of truffle oil and Parmesan. They melted in your mouth. We ordered a second helping!

The gnocchi melted in your mouth!

The gnocchi melted in your mouth!

We shared the flatbread which contained mozzarella baked into the thin and crispy crust. It was topped with arugula and freshly-sliced prosciutto.

The flatbread contained mozzarella baked into the crust and was topped with arugula and prosciutto.

The flatbread contained mozzarella baked into the crust and was topped with arugula and prosciutto.

You know you’re in a great Italian restaurant when the cured meats are hanging across from the bar counter, and the prosciutto is being sliced fresh to order — right in front of you!

The prosciutto is being sliced fresh to order right in front of you!

The prosciutto is being sliced fresh to order right in front of you!

Finally we ordered the Treva signature burger. It was topped with Vermont cheddar and arugula. It was cooked exactly as we ordered it and was large enough to share among three.

The Treva signature burger topped with Vermont cheddar and arugula.

The Treva signature burger topped with Vermont cheddar and arugula.

All of the dishes we ordered from the Happy Hour menu were wonderful. I can’t wait to go back and try some items from the full restaurant menu. Treva has several dining areas including two outdoor seating areas. Plenty of space for an elegant relaxed dinner for two or a larger group.  There is paid parking on the street or in the lot behind the restaurant.

As always, the girls have a great time catching up everyone’s lives in a setting outside of work. It’s great to relax and enjoy each other’s company! I wonder where we will be heading to next for Happy Hour?!?

 

Have you ever eaten at Treva restaurant & bar in West Hartford?

Where’s your favorite place for Happy Hour?